Category Archives: Relations Between Branches

How does the UK judicial system work?

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The Courts system in England and Wales. Scotland retains its own distinct system.
The ongoing ‘Wagatha Christie’ trial involving Colleen Rooney and Rebekah Vardy is about alleged defamation, a civil issue.

There are two types of law in the UK, criminal and civil. Criminal Law is where the state (or a private individual) seeks to punish a crime (something that the state has decided is prohibited). For example, murder is a criminal offence and necessitates a criminal trial if someone is suspected of having committed it. Civil law is where courts adjudicate on disputes between parties and allows for parties to seek compensation and damages. For example, defamation is not a criminal offence, but is a civil wrong, and can therefore be adjudicated in the civil courts.

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How did Boris Johnson (eventually) ‘Get Brexit Done’?

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Boris Johnson became Prime Minister on the 24th July 2019.

The travails of Theresa May in trying to achieve Brexit have been well documented, including in this article here! However, it is easy to forger now that when Boris Johnson became Prime Minister, he faced his own significant challenges.

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What is sovereignty and where does it reside in the British political system?

What is sovereignty?

Parliament is legally sovereign in the UK system.

Sovereignty refers to ‘supreme authority’ or ‘ultimate legal power’. In Britain, the notion of parliamentary sovereignty – that sovereignty is held by the institution of Parliament – is one of the most important principles of the British constitution. Indeed, the constitutional scholar A.V Dicey called parliamentary sovereignty one of the ‘twin pillars of the constitution’, the other being the Rule of Law:

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What are the best examples of Judicial Review in the Supreme Court since 2009?

White men still dominate judiciary, says Justice report | Judiciary | The  Guardian
The justices of the Supreme Court make the final judicial decisions on key issues bought before it.

Since the Supreme Court was established in 2009, there have been a number of significant examples of judicial review that have taken place. As the UK’s final court of appeal for both civil and criminal cases, the Supreme Court is the final judicial adjudicator on key legal and constitutional issues bought before it. Cases come to the Supreme Court after they have previously been handled by the lower courts:

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