Category Archives: Constitution

How did Boris Johnson (eventually) ‘Get Brexit Done’?

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Boris Johnson became Prime Minister on the 24th July 2019.

The travails of Theresa May in trying to achieve Brexit have been well documented, including in this article here! However, it is easy to forger now that when Boris Johnson became Prime Minister, he faced his own significant challenges.

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What is sovereignty and where does it reside in the British political system?

What is sovereignty?

Parliament is legally sovereign in the UK system.

Sovereignty refers to ‘supreme authority’ or ‘ultimate legal power’. In Britain, the notion of parliamentary sovereignty – that sovereignty is held by the institution of Parliament – is one of the most important principles of the British constitution. Indeed, the constitutional scholar A.V Dicey called parliamentary sovereignty one of the ‘twin pillars of the constitution’, the other being the Rule of Law:

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What are the best examples of Judicial Review in the Supreme Court since 2009?

White men still dominate judiciary, says Justice report | Judiciary | The  Guardian
The justices of the Supreme Court make the final judicial decisions on key issues bought before it.

Since the Supreme Court was established in 2009, there have been a number of significant examples of judicial review that have taken place. As the UK’s final court of appeal for both civil and criminal cases, the Supreme Court is the final judicial adjudicator on key legal and constitutional issues bought before it. Cases come to the Supreme Court after they have previously been handled by the lower courts:

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How significant is the power of recall in the UK?

Recall refers to the power to remove (recall) an elected politician from office. Recall is an example of direct democracy and theoretically gives voters significant control over their representatives. In Britain, the Recall of MPs Act (2015) gave voters some power to recall MPs in certain circumstances.

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Has the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act (2011) been a failed constitutional reform?

When the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act was passed in 2011 it was sold as a significant constitutional reform that would modernise the UK constitution and give more democratic legitimacy to the House of Commons. Prior to this, the calling of General Elections was governed by both statute and convention:

Septennial Act 1716 – This Act mandated that a General Election had to be called at least every seven years. In 1911, the Parliament Act reduced the maximum length of each Parliament to five years.

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