Category Archives: Constitution

Who are the Hereditary Peers?

What is meant by the Peerage?

The peerage is the system of hereditary titles within the United Kingdom, some of which date back centuries (for example, the Earldom of Arundel was created in 1138).

The current Earl of Arundel, Henry Fitzalan-Howard, the 35th Earl of Arundel.

In medieval times the distribution of titles was an important mechanism for keeping control under the Feudal System. The monarch would grant lands and title in return for the support of the Dukes and Barons in keeping law and order across his Kingdom. In more recent times, the creation of peerages has often been as a recognition of exceptional service to the nation. For example, Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery was created Viscount Montgomery of Alamein in 1946. His son and grandson have since inherited the title.

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The impartiality of the Speaker and the Denison Convention

The Speaker of the House of Commons is an elected Member of Parliament but is meant to remain politically neutral so that he can adequately discharge his or her constitutional duties.

John Bercow has been Speaker of the House of Commons since 2009

The current Speaker, John Bercow, has been consistently criticised for failing to adhere to this duty of neutrality with some notable examples.

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